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Posts Tagged ‘facebook’

I have to admit that I never unsubscribed from the Obama campaign emails, and I was just reading in Bloomberg that I’m not alone. Part of the reason I hung in there was the messaging. It was good. Okay. Very good. Stuff like “Do this for Michelle.” “Join Michelle and me” These, especially got my attention because we all love Michelle Obama.

No surprise, the Obama people are smart
They tested and retested every subject line as many as 18 times to tens of millions of readers, including me, to get the maximum impact. The killer? I will be outspent. The poor-little-me approach apparently generated more than $2.5M. Casual worked best as well as slipping in the occasional “hell” or “damn”. People love a little bit of naughty. Conclusion: Most people have a nearly limitless capacity for e-mail and won’t unsubscribe no matter how many they’re sent.

Okay. We’re addicted to our email
But we also know that we need to be constantly trying to compete for eyeballs. It’s madness out there. How to turn boring into scintillating?

Looking for easy 5 ways to start using Facebook this week?
Call me for a free overview. Top of Mind Marketing

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Every year I have a little flirtation with New Year’s resolutions. Some years I hedge my bets by calling them commitments–for some reason, this takes the power out of them, but they’re still resolutions that I generally blow off in a couple of weeks.

Topping off my list is the perennial promise to lose ten pounds. Do I keep this? Are you kidding? That’s why I don’t make New Year’s resolutions!

This year, I’m trying to make resolutions that I know I can keep. These are things that I’ve been thinking about, things that I know I am motivated to achieve:

1. Include Calls to Action on my communications. If you want something, don’t be afraid to ask for it!

2. Launch my new website. I’m making this in WordPress so that I can upload new marketing tips, archive my newsletters and link to my blogs. Sorry. Just like groceries, your website has a shelf life.

3. Follow up with potential clients on a regular basis. There really is something called a sales cycle and a quarterly call keeps you in mind. Ask potential clients when would be a good time to call back.

4. Write more, publish more and get the most out of everything I produce. I repurpose my blog posts to my newsletters and extract excerpts to social media. But there’s more: I want to start publishing these articles to ezines such as articlesbase, articlepool, tumblr, posturous, articlesnare.

Finding as many outlets as possible for your writing contributes to your SEO–get your name and your keywords out there. Ask your colleagues and clients about guest-blogging gigs–they’d probably be relieved to have someone fill a column from time to time!

5. Sex up my subject lines. Time to get creative here–and this goes for myself as well as for my clients. It really doesn’t matter how earnest or well-intentioned your message. If you don’t catch someone’s immediate attention, he/she is not going to read further.

So here I am with five resolutions. Can I keep these? This year I can because I’ve already begun embracing these business goals for 2013. If there’s anything scarier than resolutions for me, it’s goals. What a year this promises to be . . .

Ask me about capturing your clients’ attention with smart, strategic writing. It’s what we do at Top of Mind Marketing.

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1. Fill out the Profile sections on social media applications. When creating your Facebook page, Linkedin account or Twitter page, fill out all of the fields in the About/Profile sections. Make these as comprehensive as possible, using your keywords to talk about your products/services.

2. Write wallposts ahead of time so you’ll have these already prepared and you won’t have to think about what to post.

3. Create an image archive–this is a visual medium and viewers have very short attention spans.

4. Be on the lookout for articles that are relevant for your audience so you can link to these from your social media sites–this positions you as an industry expert, staying on top of what’s going on in your field. Share quotes and excerpts.

5. When people comment on your posts, respond to these comments. This activity helps keep your posts at the top of your timeline–and visible.

6. Start blogging. Use WordPress or other blogging platforms to build your blog–they’re free and easy to use. Blogging is a commitment, and you should be posting a blog at least once/week. Make sure that you’re publishing your blog to your social media sites for additional exposure and that there’s a link on your website. Repurpose your blog posts to your newsletters and excerpts to social media.

7. Use a dashboard application–ping.fm, HootSuite, etc. This will allow you to publish your posts to all of your social media sites at once. It will also allow you to schedule your social media posts ahead of time–a great tool if you’re busy going to be on vacation. Dashboard tools allow you to attach links and images and publish to Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin, Pinterest and Google+.

8. Implementing new processes: When you add new contacts to your contact management system, log in to your social media applications and ask them to become Facebook friends and to Like your Facebook page, Connect with them on Linked in and ask them to Follow you on Twitter. Do the same with them, because communication works both ways.

9. Integrate. Make sure that your website and newsletter have links to your social media sites and that you are publishing your newsletter to them.

10. Read the Help menus–you will be amazed what you will learn!

Still need help and/or running out of time? Let us help you. It’s what we do at Top of Mind Marketing.

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I’m reading a mostly excellent book on social media–it’s pragmatic and has some good case studies. But one thing has me howling. I’m at the chapter where they talk about how to involve your team. There are sections on–get this: engaging in a meaningful way, having an open dialog, ongoing training, maintaining brand standards. They go on to talk about etiquette and choosing the right employees to be on your social media team. Get a grip!

I don’t know about you, but most of my colleagues and clients are severely limited in terms of employee participation in their mostly nonexistent social media programs. The reality is that if they don’t do this, it won’t get done. Creating and maintaining a social media presence is just another line item in their already overflowing to-do list. There really isn’t any delegating going on–no training or discussion of best practices.

As someone who manages social media for my clients, I see a lot of this. Business owners are just overwhelmed with the challenges of running a business in a doing-more-with-less-climate. They don’t have time to figure out how to use social media but know they can no longer ignore it.

That’s where I come in. I design social media packages for businesses. I develop comprehensive profiles, create Facebook covers/banners, develop wallposts, create an image archive and identify articles to which to link that show that you’re staying on top of industry trends. Just as important, I am aggressive about building an online community. I want people to read what you have to say, comment on it and refer it to their colleagues. This is the power of social media.

Ask me about how I work with companies to manage and grow their social media presences.

jpeischel@top-mindmarketing.com , Top of Mind Marketing

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I’m now managing social media accounts for a growing number of clients. That means logging in to each client’s accounts and coming up with something clever to say.

I also research what’s going on in their industries and link to articles to show how brilliant they are. I identify and upload images because people have short attention spans and this is a visual medium.

Even more important, there’s the herculean task of growing their online communities so everyone will understand just how brilliant my clients are and seek them out to do business with them.

This is what I do for my social media clients, and it’s taking an increasingly bigger chunk of my time; and I’m trying to find an application to automate this effort.

The problem? There are lots of apps out there, and each has strengths, limitations and a range of price points.

I’m spending a lot of time trying to figure these out. Some have serious deficiencies–Splashcube, an app that does a great job with Twitter lead generation, doesn’t support images–this won’t work for me. I’m also spending an inordinate amount of time trying to figure out how to set up accounts for all of my clients within these apps. Endless trouble tickets and emails with little resolution are making me want to go back to doing it the old-fashioned way, but I know that I’ve got to find a way to work smarter.

My beef? Why can’t those brilliant minds down in Silicon Valley figure out what we need and just make it happen? How hard can this be?

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I recently got an email from a colleague asking me what I thought of all of these people sending emails and facebook messages asking us to Like them on their FB pages. In her case, she doesn’t know many of these people at all, and she was too nice to say that she didn’t want to know or wished she didn’t know many others.

This falls into the same category as going to a networking event and finding yourself automatically receiving someone’s newsletter without anyone’s asking your permission to be placed on a distribution list.

So what do I think? I think it’s time to suck it up and get over it! We’re all trying to build a community. Every single one of us is networking his/her ass off, working long hours, trying to think creatively and strategically. How long does it take to delete or unsubscribe from a newsletter, after all? I may or may not want to continue to receive one, but I frequently open it because I just may learn something.

Facebook and other social media apps are a way to share your expertise and thoughts. You just never know when someone’s going to see your randomized ideas and think you’re brilliant and want to work with you. It’s time to be a little generous.

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While maligned by many, I continue to love newsletters as an excellent way to stay in front of clients and prospects on a regular basis; and I write and produce these for both myself and clients. If you’re getting even a quarter of your list opening your newsletter, it’s very good ROI.

I also love Constant Contact, which I’ve used for years. They are a fabulous vendor–smart, proactive and nimble. They stay on top of new trends and are constantly updating their application. Best of all, their customer service is extraordinary. When you’re on a deadline and call their support line, there is a friendly, knowledgeable person on the other end who speaks English and can ALWAYS quickly answer your questions.

Last week I went to one of their free 3 1/2 -hour e-marketing seminars. I was hoping to learn exciting new things and have a chance to do some networking. I had an earlier meeting, so I arrived an hour or so late. That was the good news, because the seminar was a total snooze.

There were more than 50 people there, plus presenters, a panel, moderator and a guy from PC World who should have known everything. If he did, he wasn’t up for sharing it. The problem? I wanted them to tell me something I didn’t know.

Facebook now has 900M users, but it didn’t seem like any of them attended this seminar. One woman asked what e-marketing was. Another asked about keeping her contact list private. Where do they come up with these questions? I talked to one of the panelists, and he understood my frustration, but apparently there are so many people who remain mystified by social media that they are forced to appeal to this demographic–the lowest common denominator.

While I continue to keep my eyes open for the many free events that are sponsored by a wide range of organizations, I’m managing my expectations for learning anything new. That said, attending these kinds of events always represents an opportunity for networking, and that’s never a bad thing.

Sadly, for this event, the best part was the carrot cupcake with cream cheese frosting.

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